How to Find a Nearshore Development Team: Technology Matters

Adriana Campoy
November 9, 2020

When you're looking for a nearshore software development company, it's important to take a close look at their portfolio and the technologies they work with. Be wary of boutique software development firms that claim to be experts in every technology and programming language, as it's unlikely they have extensive experience in everything. You are better off looking for a company that focuses on only a few programming languages and technologies, as their developers are more likely to have true expertise in them. As you assemble your short list of potential software partners, we recommend including the technologies they work with as an essential part of your decision-making process.

If you're outsourcing because you have an existing product that needs work, it goes without saying that you'll need to make sure the nearshore team you choose is well-versed in your product's tech stack. If you're developing a new product, however, there are key factors you should take into account while you examine each company's areas of technical expertise.

Budget

The technologies your software partner specializes in will have a great impact on project cost. The largest part of your development budget will go towards developers' salaries, and experts in different programming languages have different hourly rates. If a software company you're considering works with very new technologies, keep in mind that these tend to be more expensive to implement, not to mention maintain after you've released your minimum viable product. We recommend short-listing companies that work with mature programming languages that are also likely to remain popular in the future. A company that works with open source software is also a great choice, not only because the source code is free; open source software can save you money on billable hours because developers can often adapt existing code to your product rather than always start from scratch.

Scalability

While looking through a nearshore company's portfolio, you'll also want to make sure that they build solutions with a tech stack that is easily scalable. Inadequate technology choices can cause the need to migrate the entire product to a different technology so that you can efficiently add new features and handle a growing user base – an expensive and tedious situation you definitely want to avoid. You need to feel confident that the potential software partners on your short list have the right expertise to make smart decisions regarding your product's architecture and tech stack.

Support & Maintenance

The technologies your app uses will also impact the convenience and price tag of maintaining your product. New and shiny programming languages have a smaller talent pool. This means that if a software company you're considering works with new, niche technologies but doesn't offer support services, it will be difficult and costly to find other developers to maintain your product. Look for companies that value long-term relationships with their customers and will stay with you through the support and maintenance phase. In addition, we once again recommend looking at nearshore development companies that work with mature, widely-used programming languages and open source technologies. Your product's tech stack will affect how easy it is to update, monitor, and maintain your app, so the technologies a company specializes in are crucial to your product's quality and growth.

Learn More

There are other critical factors to think about once you get down to the business of building your app, which you can read about on our blog post about choosing the right tech stack. However, we hope this post has given you some insight on how technology should factor into your decisions as you narrow down your choices of potential nearshore software development companies.

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"How to Find a Nearshore Development Team: Technology Matters" by Adriana Campoy is licensed under CC BY SA. Source code examples are licensed under MIT.

Photo by Clément H.

Categorized under Research and Learning.